Often asked: How Long Does It Take To Repair A Car?

How long does it take to repair a car after an accident?

After a car accident, a claims adjuster from your insurance company will estimate the damage to your car and produce a repair estimate. Getting a collision body repair estimate can take anywhere from two to five days depending on the insurance company you use.

How long does it take to get a car fixed through insurance?

Here’s the thing, your insurance company has nothing to do with the actual repair of your vehicle. They do, however, have an employee known as an insurance adjuster come out to your chosen body shop to evaluate your vehicle, and approve repairs. This process typically takes 4-5 days.

Is it worth repairing a car after an accident?

Many times, fixing your damaged car will be the best option – especially if the repairs will be covered by your auto insurance. Buying a new car can be costly, leaving you with five or more years of debt, while getting it repaired (depending on the damages) might cost you a few thousand dollars.

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Can I repair my own car after filing a claim?

In simple terms; yes, you can repair your own car should you wish. It does, of course, depend on the type of insurance cover you have; collision or comprehensive, as you’ll have a maximum cover cost to claim that would have been originally made clear to you when you took out your policy.

Do insurance adjusters lie?

Do Insurance Adjusters Lie? Yes, insurance adjusters sometimes lie about a claim. They may want you to believe that you don’t qualify for certain types of damages. They may also allow you to believe your settlement is much lower than the average car accident settlement.

Who gets the insurance check when a car is totaled?

If you’re financing a car that’s been totaled, your insurance company will likely make the claim check payable to both you and your lender, which means you’ll have to come to an agreement with your lender on how to release that money, the Insurance Information Institute (III) says.

Can you force an insurance company to repair your car?

It is illegal for an insurance company to steer, force, require or pressure you into using a particular shop. You should never take your vehicle to a body shop based solely on the recommendation of an insurance company. Not even if it is your own insurance company.

Should I repair my car before trading it in?

It is beneficial to spend some time sprucing up your car before beginning trade negotiations, but be sure to set a budget for small fix-ups. Perform simple maintenance and cheap cosmetic fixes (like fixing scratches), but remember that you don’t want to spend so much money that you end up losing money on the trade.

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Who pays for car repairs in an accident?

If you have collision coverage, your insurer should pay for the repairs, except for your deductible. When the accident is someone else’s fault but you end up paying a deductible and using your own insurance, you have the option to go after the other driver personally.

How does car insurance work when you are not at fault?

In most cases, your insurance company won’t have to pay for a not-at-fault accident since the other driver’s policy will cover your expenses. But if you’re hit by an uninsured motorist or you’re the victim of a hit-and-run, your policy might cover the damages depending on what types of coverage you have.

Can I get cash instead of repairs?

Answer: In general, when you make a claim against your own auto insurance policy, you can choose to “cash out” and receive money as compensation (minus your deductible amount) instead of having your insurer pay a body shop to fix your vehicle.

Can I insist on having my car repaired?

You have the right to choose the repair shop you want to use. You’re entitled to have your vehicle repaired to its pre-accident condition. By law, you’re only required to obtain one repair estimate.

Can I service my own car and keep the warranty?

You can service your own car and keep the warranty. According to the Magnuson-Moss Warranty act, which is enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, it’s illegal for manufacturers or dealers to void your warranty or deny you coverage because you performed the work yourself.

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